Leveraging UX Research to Innovate Top MLS Application

  • Intuitive Applications
Key Results

Became the first MLS system to seamlessly support tablet devices (such as the iPad) and mobile-friendly access on all browsers, platforms, and devices.

Summary

dynaConnections is an Austin-based real estate software company that is renowned for its dedication to service and constant innovation. dynaConnections’ flagship product is connectMLS, a leading software application that has been adopted by real estate multiple-listing services across the country.

UX 4Sight was tasked with providing strategic UX direction to help make connectMLS easier to search, filter, and save listings across desktop, tablet, and mobile platforms.

The dynaConnections and UX 4Sight teams worked together to better differentiate the connectMLS application through UX best practices and laboratory-based usability testing of real estate professionals.

Our interdisciplinary approach to user-centered design included a team of UX and UI designers, user researchers, front- and back-end developers, and various business leaders across our companies.

This effort was also supported by MRED, the largest user of connectMLS, which serves more than 48,000 Realtors®. MRED recognized and announced its commitment to making connectMLS more mobile friendly for its members.

Due to an NDA with the dynaConnections, we do not include all the details in this case study.

Objectives

Our UX experts had a clear objective to make the application consistent, intuitive, and ensure that it was redesigned following UX design principles. 

Upon working closely with the dynaConnections team, we uncovered many UX design issues that disrupted the overall experience for the users.

Solutions

Taking our findings and knowledge of UX best practices into consideration, dynaConnections was able to develop a much more intuitive application by:

unconventional to use for the intended function of removing a filter.

BEFORE:  Filters

  • An eraser typically indicates to erase something, but in this instance, it was meant to indicate to remove a filter. 
Filter chips are no longer represented by the erasers icons

AFTER:  Filtering

  • Making sure that the filter chips are no longer represented by the eraser icons and are accessible, yet compact enough to not impede user flow.
A few users noticed the Sort dropdown and Ascending function above the table.

BEFORE:  Search Listings

  • Sorting features required users to search for patterns before understanding data was sorted by price.
  • The Sort dropdown and Ascending function above the table made it difficult to locate.
List drop down views, wrap, and rows were carefully designed for mobile

AFTER:  Mobile Listing Results

  • Ensuring that list drop-down views, wrap, and rows were carefully designed for mobile.
  • Prioritizing buttons and menu items.
trash bin, Cancel, and X on shape on map

BEFORE:  Map

  • Need for trash bin, Cancel, and X on shape not necessary as they all had the same function.
  • The map appeared clickable and users assumed it would take them to listing details. 
  • Shape appeared movable, but was not.
Map flow was significantly more streamlined

AFTER:  Map

  • Streamlining the map flow and removing unnecessary objects.
The checkbox position is inconsistent from the List

BEFORE:  Listing Details

  • The checkbox position is inconsistent from the List / Table View and not closely associated with its object, the address.
  • Address, as a unique record identifier, was not very prominent.
  • An X button is universally understood to close a window but was being used inconsistently. 
  • The use of multiple icons made the page look cluttered.
  • Summary data appeared disorganized and cluttered.
Showing checkbox in front of address is consistent with List Table View.

AFTER:  Listing Details

  • Showing checkbox in front of the address to be consistent with List Table View.
  • Ensuring summary data is labeled and organized.
Mobile version of the listing details page

AFTER:  Mobile Listing Details

  • Displaying large and prominent address.
  • Including a mobile version of the Listing Details page, which follows consistent conventions to the desktop version.
  • Validating that icons made sense and functioned as a user would expect.
    Key Results

    Became the first MLS system to seamlessly support tablet devices (such as the iPad) and mobile-friendly access on all browsers, platforms, and devices.

    Let’s Design Kinder & more profitable UX

    Ready to learn more about how our award-winning UX agency can help you?

    LET'S DO THIS